Posts Tagged youtube

7 Helpful Social Media Demographic Stats (2018)

While the opinions on frequent use of social media has been a constant debate, it is no controversy that brands who want continued growth must pursue these social platforms to stay engaged with their audience.

When you’re looking to match a social strategy with your demographic, you’ll have to determine which platforms to go with. Here’s a few neat takeaways from Pew’s recent Social Media Fact Sheet.

 

1) 69% of American adults use social media

In 2005 it was 5%. Social platforms have obviously risen and adoption continues to rise.

social media adoption over time

 

2) The less money you make, the less likely you are to use Social

There’s a small correlation showing that individuals with higher incomes use at least one social site.

social media use and income

 

3) Facebook is still king

Yes, other social networks have grown substantially, but they’re in the #2 pack. Facebook is still far above the others with YouTube (roughly considered a social network) now making an appearance on the graph below.

social media network popularity

 

4) Facebook reaches young adults

While the trending platform for young adults change often, Facebook has had 81% of the market covered.

facebook reaches young adults

 

5) YouTube reaches more young adults than Facebook

YouTube reportedly reached over 91% of young adults which is massive.

youtube reaches young adults

 

6) Facebook and YouTube are neck and neck in reach

Comparing the two giants, the reach seems to be quite similar. Having a strong presence on both would surely deliver your messaging to a large percentage of your audience.

facebook vs youtube reach

 

7) YouTube’s reach is weekly, Facebook’s is daily

Yes, YouTube has a similar reach but the daily use (aka addiction level) on Facebook is much higher. YouTube has the reach, but it is likely to be a weekly or a “less often” impression.

social media daily and weekly usage

So there’s our top takeaways from Pew’s latest research. Did you think these statistics were within expectations?